CCKW/CHEV hood side panels

RANGER
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Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 8:29 pm
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CCKW/CHEV hood side panels

Post by RANGER »

Betcha didn't know this one. Those screens that are inside the late Chev/CCKW Hood Side Panels are part or the Radio Shielding System.

Where else is there a GMC Forum with this much CCKW technical information? :wink:
US ARMY HONOR GRADUATE MECHANIC, Restorer of fine Jeeps, MV's, MVPA 40+yrs, DAV, Army Aircrew member, Donor to Military Museums & CAF, MV Hobby since 1945
Other Hobby- Army Air Force & Busting Big Ass Military Imposters-Good at it
Guest

Post by Guest »

Where else?


http://www.cckw.org

The original and still the best.

Many posts by Joel Gopan from Maine USA and others on how to maintain your CCKW and Chevys and get a lot of life, mileage and enjoyment out of them without spending a fortune. Little tricks to help keep your CCKW going in the ever changing world of gasoline, laws, parts availability etc.
RANGER
1st Sergeant
1st Sergeant
Posts: 6510
Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 8:29 pm
Location: Nearest Motor Pool

Post by RANGER »

There is no way to have a good restored CCKW without spending a lot of money. Money saving tips are fine, but experienced mechanics are priceless, especially those with WWII Army service school background, and actual CCKW background.
It is possible, with a lot of hard work, to achieve that nice CCKW with 100% military parts and have "turn key trouble free operation." It cannot be done in a few weeks, and may take years.

As for other sites, that is up to what type of information the collector is looking for. This site has quality information not to be found anywhere else on the world wide net or in periodicals. I personally look forward to maintenance advice of veterans who have "hands on" CCKW experience from their Army Motorpool days, and that is hard to find on the web sites.
Maintenance per the TM is the best way to go, as it is straight forward from the persons who designed the truck, and is excellent for those who repair and restore using the original parts. It also boils down to the capability of the owner of a worn 60 year old CCKW. Sometimes one as to make the best of what one has.

I am partial to WWII Vehicles and have a lot of background and interest on WWII era aircraft. What is great is when CCKWs and the occasional warbird can share the same space at an airshow. Many WWII and Korea era Veterans show up at these events, and it helps make their day.
US ARMY HONOR GRADUATE MECHANIC, Restorer of fine Jeeps, MV's, MVPA 40+yrs, DAV, Army Aircrew member, Donor to Military Museums & CAF, MV Hobby since 1945
Other Hobby- Army Air Force & Busting Big Ass Military Imposters-Good at it
Guest

Post by Guest »

The cckw.org site is a GREAT site! Lots of fine information from that Joel Gopan person and others.

As far as going by the TM is concerned:

There are a number of TMs for the cckw. All but one tell you to adjust the clutch incorrectly. So going by the TM will (in most cases based upon more being wrong than right) will get you a "GMC clutch" for your efforts. People and manuals can be wrong. Sometimes one persons experience can beat an incorrect manual.

Even Joel talked about his personal "fine tuning" of a bearing adjustment as I recall....

Dr Deuce
RANGER
1st Sergeant
1st Sergeant
Posts: 6510
Joined: Sat Jul 01, 2006 8:29 pm
Location: Nearest Motor Pool

Post by RANGER »

Not really, the TM10 manuals did show 1" free play and the 1944 TM9-801 does show 2 1/2", but there is more to the story. By 1943 there were 200,000+ CCKWs in action, and that meant that there were was potential for more clutch problems because of the large number of CCKWs. There was no incorrect clutch adjustment, but there was a change in the procedure. It was intended to cut back on the potential for failures, as the diaphragm clutch could be damaged by overflexing of the fingers. The Procedure for adjusting the clutch in the TM10 Maintenance manusals was not incorrect, it instructed the mechanic to adjust the pedal for 1" of freeplay, that was fine for a new clutch assy, but as the clutch wore, and the clutch was readjusted, it could cause overflexing of the diaphragms. Giving the clutch adjustment more free play, lessened the chance of over flexing the diaphragm spring. The latter specification was used at the factory from July 43 on. I have misplaced my TM9-801 dated 12 April 43, but the Change is reflected in TM9-801 dated 24 April 44. There were two bulletins, one in Jube 43, and another in December 1943 pertaining to the change. The clutch from June 43 on was factory set at 2 1/2", the service bulletins also reflected the change. The new setting was to eliminate overflexing of the clutch diaphragm, and prevent the possibility of flexing the clutch fingers beyond that necessary for clutch release. As in any clutch, wear occurs, the bulletin mentions to maintain 2 1/2" freeplay if at all possible, and that wear may prevent ajustment to 2 1/2", in that case it is indicated to reduce free travel to 1", and when 1" cannot be obtained, it indicates to replace the clutch.

When it all boils down, 1" freeplay is still in spec in some instances.

Being a good mechanic, and familiar with the feel of the CCKW clutch, I prefer 1" and am used to the feel of my truck in that I use a minimum of depression to disengage my clutch. My clutch has been in my truck for 23 years and has not needed readjustment yet.
Different drivers have different clutch habits, and going to 2 1/2" gave the CCKW clutch longevity. No mistakes, just good service advice from General Motors and Army Ordnance Command.

To sum it up, the information in the earler manuals was updated thru a series of service bulletins, factory production line procedures, changes published to be inserted into existing manuals, and the up grade published in the latest CCKW operators manual, TM9-801 dated 24 April 44. The Army was the primary fleet user and had a system in effect where bulletins and changes were published and sent into the field. All of this information was managed thru service schools, Motor Officers at all levels and finally to the good old Motor Sergeants to oversee, the system worked. The collector, 60 years later does not have the resources of General Motors and Ordnance Command to draw on, correct maintence on their CCKW depends on much research.
US ARMY HONOR GRADUATE MECHANIC, Restorer of fine Jeeps, MV's, MVPA 40+yrs, DAV, Army Aircrew member, Donor to Military Museums & CAF, MV Hobby since 1945
Other Hobby- Army Air Force & Busting Big Ass Military Imposters-Good at it