Segmented Rear Mud Flaps - Reason Why?

Guest

Segmented Rear Mud Flaps - Reason Why?

Post by Guest »

I was wondering what the reason could be for changing to this style from a simple pressing - would it be to save steel by using up otherwise wasted offcuts but this would be offset by the increased labour putting the segments together.

And they must have needed a stay of some kind to stop getting caught up on the tyres when reversing etc.

Anyone know more on this??

Robbo.
RANGER
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Post by RANGER »

The rigid rear Splash Guards were vulnerable to tree stumps, rocks, curbing, or what ever obstacle the truck backed into or over, the tires could then be damaged by the bent Splash Guard if it were not pulled back. If the truck were under attack, there could be problems. Ever try to straighten a genuine CCKW Splash Guard, they are tempered and not made of mild steel such as the repros are. The front Splash Guards were not as vulnerable. The swinging rear Splash Guard was introduced on the late Composite Cargo Body, they were not prone to the contact damage that the rigid Splash Guard was. Had the war gone on for years, it is possible that there would have been as many CCKWs with swinging Splash Guards as there were rigid.
You will note that the M-Series M-35 and M-211 Splash Guard of the early 50s had a hinged lower rubber section. The Ordnance engineers constantly sought improvements, they had input from the field of the performance of tens of thouands of CCKWs. Reports of unsatisfactory performance in the field was via the "UER" (Unsatisfactory Equipmentv Report). The collectorr is sort of focused on his one and only truck which is sort of out to pasture when compared with the use that wartime CCKWs got.
Ya gotta think big. :wink:
Last edited by RANGER on Fri Aug 18, 2006 4:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Thanks for information

Post by Guest »

Thanks for the explanation Ranger.

They must be pretty rare compared with the fixed flaps - I've certainly never seen one here in Australia but then most of our GMC's are earlier war production. The late models were shipped directly north to the battles in the SWPA.
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Post by RANGER »

I have only noticed them on Late LWB Cargo with composite bodied trucks with late USA registrations in the 486XXXX range and higher, that would late 44 on. Not all Composite bodied trucks had them. They are not listed in the 1951 SNLs which are the latest. They also saved on metal and could eliminate the rear braces.
US ARMY HONOR GRADUATE MECHANIC, Restorer of fine Jeeps, MV's, MVPA 40+yrs, DAV, Army Aircrew member, Donor to Military Museums & CAF, MV Hobby since 1945
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RANGER
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Post by RANGER »

I have only noticed them on Late LWB Cargo with composite bodied trucks with late USA registrations in the 486XXXX range and higher, that would late 44 on. Not all Composite bodied trucks had them. They are not listed in the 1951 SNLs which are the latest. They also saved on metal and eliminate the need for rear braces.
US ARMY HONOR GRADUATE MECHANIC, Restorer of fine Jeeps, MV's, MVPA 40+yrs, DAV, Army Aircrew member, Donor to Military Museums & CAF, MV Hobby since 1945
Other Hobby- Army Air Force & Busting Big Ass Military Imposters-Good at it